Sunday, May 31, 2020

What is Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD) and How Does EBD System Work?

Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD) is is an automobile brake technology that automatically regulates the brake force distribution between the vehicle's wheels based on speed, loading, road conditions, etc, providing stronger and safer braking performance in emergency situations.
Electronic brakeforce distribution
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD): The active safety features in cars

What is Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD)?

Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD) is is an automobile brake technology that automatically regulates the brake force distribution between the vehicle's wheels based on mathematical equations, speed, loading, road conditions, etc, making performance better at braking distance and brake stability.

The electronic brake-force distribution system is an effective vehicle safety feature designed to make braking as effective as possible, as it reduces stopping distance and collision risk by automatically balancing the brake force applied to each wheel according to the vehicle's overall weight distribution
EBD system can also allocate more brake force to wheels that require more braking force and it maximizes stopping power whilst maintaining vehicular control.

Electronic Brake Force Distribution Components

The EBD system consists of several devices and sensors, whose function is to collect data and correct the braking process, namely:
  • Speed ​​sensors.
  • Electronic control units.
  • Brake force modulators.
  • Steering wheel angle sensors.
  • Yaw sensors.

How Does Electronic Brakeforce Distribution Work?

How EBD system works
How does EBD work in a car?

How the EBD System Works

The electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD or EBFD) system monitors each of the individual brakes and wheels. 
Under braking, the EBD system decides which wheel to brake less and which wheel to brake more depending on many conditions like load-bearing on each wheel, speed of the vehicle, condition of the road, and so on. 

In the EBD system, brakes typically operate by collecting data from the speed sensors to determine if any of the wheels are not spinning at the same speed as the other wheels.
 If something different is found, it means that one or more tires may be in a sliding position, at which time corrective measures can be taken.

These systems can also compare the data from the Yaw sensor to the steering wheel angle sensor data to see if the vehicle is out of control or not, then that data is processed by the electronic control unit to ensure the relative load on each wheel.

If the electronic control unit determines that one or more wheels are under a lighter load than the other, it is able to use the brake force modulators to reduce the brake force to that wheel. This happens dynamically, so the brake strength can be adjusted continuously in response to prevailing conditions.

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